Martin Luther King Protest Speech in Selma Alabama in February 1965 Type 1 Proof Photo

On February 1, 1965, Martin Luther King Jr. led more than 250 activists to the Dallas County Courthouse to register to vote. All of them were arrested during the peaceful demonstration and charged with parading without a permit. In a letter written from the local jail that same night, and later published in the New York Times, Dr. King decried the racist conditions in Selma and observed that "there are more Negroes in jail with me than there are on the voting rolls."

The arrests of Dr. King and the other civil rights activists resulted in protests in which African Americans were injured and killed. Despite these attacks, Dr. King and other civil rights leaders continued their work and organized another voting rights march from Selma to Montgomery the following month.

Offered is a phenomenal 7” x  8.75” UPI original “Proof” photo that has the teletype caption attached to the top of the photograph.  This was the actual master photo used before it was sent across the wires to every major newspaper in the country. 

This historic photograph depicts Martin Luther King speaking in Selma, Alabama (see the award winning movie, “Selma” for more historical reference) on February 23, 1965 telling his followers that they needed more protest marches.  This would all lead up to President Lyndon B. Johnson passing the Civil Rights Act later in the year.

Original United Press stamping on the back of the photo!



Item: 12237

Price: $2,995.00
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Martin Luther King Protest Speech in Selma Alabama in February 1965 Type 1 Proof Photo